Thursday, July 25, 2024
HomeConflict300 Namtu villagers flee as RCSS, TNLA resume fighting

300 Namtu villagers flee as RCSS, TNLA resume fighting

More than 300 locals fled their villages and took refuge in a monastery near Namtu town when armed clashes broke out on Saturday between the Restoration Council of Shan State/Shan State Army (RCSS/SSA) and Ta’ang National Liberation Army (TNLA).

“The fighting broke out in Mong Hway village, near Tar Pan creek,” said a local aid worker on Sunday. “Last night and this morning, a total of 324 people from six villages gathered what belongings they could and fled on foot. Those villages are now completely abandoned. We [aid teams] heard gunfire and moved in to rescue those who were trapped in the crossfire. The fighting subsided around noon.”

The 324 villagers are now being sheltered at a Buddhist monastery in Man San village near Namtu town. Local aid organisations have provided them blankets and rice.

The aid worker added: “We never had any problems before with armies fighting in this area. But now, I really don’t what will happen next. Even though the gunfire has ceased, the villagers will have to wait at the monastery until we get the all-clear.”

[related]

The TNLA announced that its Battalion 919 had clashed over the weekend with RCSS/SSA in Namtu Township, and that similar skirmishes and battles had taken place near the border of Namhsan and Kyaukme townships.

The RCSS/SSA has not yet made any comment.

Both sides have clashed in southern Shan State several times over the past two years. The RCSS, or SSA-South, is a signatory to the Burmese government’s Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement, while the TNLA is part of a coalition known as the Northern Alliance which launched attacks on Burmese army positions in northern Shan State in November 2016.

 

RELATED ARTICLES

Feel the passion for press freedom ignite within you.

Join us as a valued contributor to our vibrant community, where your voice harmonizes with the symphony of truth. Together, we'll amplify the power of free journalism.

Lost Password?
Contact