Friday, February 23, 2024
HomeUncategorizedArtists call for aid provision in remote areas

Artists call for aid provision in remote areas

May 22, 2008 (DVB), Composers, poets and writers in Burma have called for immediate provision of food and relief supplies to cyclone victims living in remote areas.

A team consisting of about 30 composers, poets and writers, including composer Ko Ye Lwin, went to a remote village in Dadaye township called Hleseikchaungkyi on 19 May to donate supplies to cyclone survivors.

They said about 50 people in the village were killed by the storm and over 1000 were left homeless. Only a monastery and two out of 314 houses were not destroyed.

Ko Toe Lwin, one of the team members, told DVB that people had been frightened by the cyclone and were waiting for others to come and help them.

"They are just expecting donors; they want food and clothes," he said.

"We couldn't provide them with as much relief as we to distribute because it was the first trip of people from literary and musical society and we also had financial constraints."

The team provided the villagers with clothes, snacks, noodles, rice, medicine, slippers and some cash.

"They live in a remote area so they are facing severe hardships," continued Ko Toe Lwin.

"Some were crying as they said they wanted to have a house while other said they would be satisfied if they could receive a small amount of assistance for their survival. Some also said even a needle is valuable to them now."

Another team member, poet Lin Htate Shin, told DVB that there were still many other areas left without help and that refugee camps were need for cyclone survivors living in those areas.

The artists' team plans to make another trip to provide aid and is currently collecting cash and relief supplies.

Reporting by Khin Hnin Htet

RELATED ARTICLES

Feel the passion for press freedom ignite within you.

Join us as a valued contributor to our vibrant community, where your voice harmonizes with the symphony of truth. Together, we'll amplify the power of free journalism.

Lost Password?
Contact