Electricity protests in Rangoon end

Electricity protests in Rangoon end

Rangoon’s residents calling for better electricity supplies in Burma’s economic hub blew out their candles on Sunday and stopped protesting.

After suffering through days with six hours of access to electricity, Rangoon is now able to keep the lights on for about 20 hours a day.

“Now there is 20 hours of electricity from the previous six in Rangoon and other cities,” said Han Win Aung, one of the protesters. “Although it’s not 24 hours, this is still acceptable.”

“We marked the successful conclusion of our vigil by blowing out our candles at Sule Pagoda.”

He said the improved electricity supplies in the city may be due to increased production at hydropower stations as the rainy season commences.

There were also reports that authorities were conserving energy and cutting back on consumption in Naypyidaw, which usually enjoys 24 hours of unfettered access to the country’s grid.

“Now the rainy season has arrived and also we heard [authorities] were cutting down on the use of electricity in Naypyidaw,” said Han Win Aung.

“Most people are satisfied because the situation is now a lot more convenient than before and also that the protest [remained civil].”

The electricity quota in Mandalay has also increased to 12 hours a day.

Electricity protests kicked off in Mandalay on 20 May and eventually spread throughout the country in Rangoon, Monywa and Prome.

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